New publication: Re-imagining Commonly Used Mobile Interfaces for Older Adults

Many countries have an increasingly ageing population. In recent years, mobile technologies have had a massive impact on social and working lives. As the size of the older user population rises, many people will want to continue professional, social and lifestyle usage of mobiles into 70s and beyond. Mobile technologies can lead to increased community involvement and personal independence. While mobile technologies can provide many opportunities, the ageing process can interfere with their use. This workshop brings together researchers who are re-imagining common mobile interfaces so that they are more suited to use by older adults.

Nicol, E., Dunlop M., Komninos A., McGee-Lennon M., Baillie L., Edwards A., et al. (2014).  Re-imagining Commonly Used Mobile Interfaces for Older Adults. Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Human-computer Interaction with Mobile Devices & Services (MobileHCI'14). 585–588New York, NY, USA, ACM. DOI:10.1145/2628363.2634261
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New publication: Investigating Mobile Text Entry for Older Adults

Text entry remains key to many tasks on touchscreen smartphones and is an important factor in the usability of such devices. The known problems of text entry can be particularly acute for older adults due to physical and cognitive issues associated with ageing. In a study of mobile text entry we employed a variety of participatory design techniques in order to develop novel keyboard layouts to address the requirements of this group of users. We report on the early findings and the methodological implications for further research in this area. Based on our results we argue that making the effort to involve older adults in the design process has benefits that could not otherwise be achieved.

Nicol, E., Komninos A., & Dunlop M. D. (2014).  Investigating Mobile Text Entry for Older Adults. Workshop on Reimagining Mobile Interfaces for Older Adults, in conjunction with ACM MobileHCI'14. Toronto, Canada.

New publication: Sensing Airports’ Traffic by Mining Location Sharing Social Services

Location sharing social services are popular among mobile users resulting in a huge social dataset available for researchers to explore. In this paper we consider location sharing social services’ APIs endpoints as “social sensors” that provide data revealing real world interactions, although in some cases, the number of recorded social data can be several orders of magnitude lower compared to the number of real world interactions. In the presented work we focus on check-ins at airports performing two experiments: one analyzing check-in data collected exclusively from Foursquare and another collecting additionally check-in data from Facebook. We compare the two popular location sharing social platforms’ check-ins and we show that for the case of Foursquare these data can be indicative of the passengers’ traffic, while their number is hundreds of times lower than the number of actual traffic observations.

Garofalakis, J., Georgoulas I., Komninos A., Ntentopoulos P., & Plessas A. (2015).  Sensing Airports’ Traffic by Mining Location Sharing Social Services. Current Trends in Web Engineering: 15th International Conference, ICWE 2015 Workshops, NLPIT, PEWET, SoWEMine, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, June 23-26, 2015. Revised Selected Papers. 9396, 131-140., Springer. DOI:10.1007/978-3-319-24800-4
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New publication: Use of Self-Reporting Questionnaires to Evaluate Augmented Paper Maps for Group Navigation

One popular and widely use of augmented reality based application, is the projection of points of interests on top of the phones’ camera view. In this paper we discuss the implementation of an AR application that acts as a magic lens over printed maps, overlaying POIs and routes. This method expands the information space available to members of groups during navigation, partially mitigating the issue of several group members trying to share a small screen device. Our work complements existing literature by focusing on the navigation tasks and by using self-reporting questionnaires to measure affective state and user experience. We evaluate this system with groups of real tourists in a pre- liminary field trial and report our findings.

Komninos, A., Besharat J., & Garofalakis J. (2015).  Use of Self-Reporting Questionnaires to Evaluate Augmented Paper Maps for Group Navigation. 12th European Conference on Ambient Intelligence. Athens, Greece, Springer.
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New publication: An investigation of the suitability of heterogeneous social network data for use in mobile tourist guides

Social Networking Sites (SNS) are used daily by billions of people worldwide to keep them informed about the latest news, to help them interact with other people as well as to provide them with Points of Interest (POIs) to visit. In this paper we examine to what extent the information from SNSs such as likes, tags, check- ins can influence the visitors or locals of a city in choosing venues to visit. Next, we implement an Android application, Social City, for mobile devices, which collects and evaluates the information from Facebook and Foursquare in order to recommend to users venues to visit in the city of Patras, Greece. Finally, we discuss an evaluation of Social City. Our results indicate that the combination of SNS data from multiple social networking sites into a single rating, appears to lead to more efficient recommendations for the users, helping them choose faster and easier and with more confidence about the quality of their choice.

Papadimitriou, G., Komninos A., & Garofalakis J. (2015).  An investigation of the suitability of heterogeneous social network data for use in mobile tourist guides. 19th ACM Panhellenic Conference on Informatics . Athens, Greece, ACM. DOI:10.1145/2801948.2801970
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